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Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)
this was not political, it was not for this, this, and this reason, it was in fact trying to make sure the mesh economy was on solid base and that we could get some jobs back. >> we're about four minutes from the beginning of that q&a session. we are monitoring mr. bernanke's address, art. we'll bring you the session when it does begin. >>> bond traders also keeping a very close eye on mr. bernanke and his remarks and the upcoming q&a that we'll bring you. rick santelli tracking the action at the cme. reactions? >> i've been phoning around. there is a very common thread especially among a lot of the futures traders. they keyed if on one sentence of ben bernanke. we'll show it on the screen. we expect that a highly accommodative stance of monetary policy remain appropriate for a considerable time after the economy strengthens. and this is what traders were not happy about. i talked to two or three traders that said they're going to be moving now almost exclusively in trading non-financials, commodities, precious metals, and his opinion -- things that the fed can't print. they also think that ultimately
all out in september, a hopeful sign that the u.s. economy may be picking up. >> tom: i'm tom hudson. ben bernanke defends his strategy at the federal reserve to do more to help the economy. >> susie: and how technology is making it possible for doctors to go paperless. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> susie: the first day of the new quarter, kicks off with a blue chip rally. investors were encouraged by a report showing that american factories were busy in september. a popular index of national factory activity rose to 51.5 last month, from 49.6 in august. it was the fastest pace of production since may. but that upbeat news was overshadowed by comments from federal reserve chief ben bernanke, saying the economy is not growing fast enough to bring down the unemployment rate. we'll have more on that in a moment. those two events led to volatile trading here on wall street. the dow rose about 78 points, but was up as much as 155 points earlier. the nasdaq drifted in and out of positive and negative territory, finally losing more than 2.5 points, and the s&p rose almost fo
questions after his speech. let's listen in. >> japan, of course, is the first modern economy to be trapped at the zero bound. interest rates close to zero. their experience foreshadowed the global financial crisis of 2008. the japanese had a stock market booming bust and a property boom and bust together which was roughly double the size, proportionally speaking, to the united states. it was a major shock to the economy. they have responded to it to a variety of tools. i think a couple things that we learned from watching their experience and troubles and difficulties they have been through and to that i would point to that we have tried to learn from them, the first is, aggressiveness, early aggressiveness of monetary policy. what we learned from japan is we learned from the 1930s. once you have a deflation, prices dropping, prices and wages are dropping, they can be very very hard to get out of that. there is a lot of downward pressure on the economy. we were very aggressive early on in the united states to avoid deflation and we have maintained inflation close to our 2% target which is
, but the fact he was not speaking optimistically about the economy and the effects of qe3 on the economy sent a damper on the stocks. a nice way to begin the day with 75 up on the dow, 3.6 on the s&p, and, again, nasdaq is the only one in the red. lauren: sometimes the fed tie doesn't list everything. silver ending at seven month highs. look at that. david: oil, a little of a rise, natural gas, though, we want to focus on natural gas because we have seen that thing grow for the past month or so. it was up 5% today. if you're looking for some play in energy, oil seems a little too hectic for you, go to natural gas. with ce get -- can we get that up there? okay. switch to airlines. lauren: they are seeing a pop today. as you see, there was a report out earlier saying the outlook for the airline industry is improving. that's a good sign. look at that. up arrows across the board. david: ibm, you knew it was a pick when warren buffet went in there. today, look at this, an all time 10-year high at the top there trading at $210.43 per share. that was a 1.5% jump today. a nice big move by ibm. fed ch
to stimulate the economy. again, i put stimulate in quotes because who knows if it is momentary for china. >> we have this bump of china of 2.5%, you can't underestimate the short-term tailwind, whatever they have for the economic expansion, especially on commodities prices. that is part of the reason why we have a significant progress. david: were you aware of all this? that is basically what it is. were you worry about it? >> i am very suspicious and wary. however, i don't think that the close is clear. a little bit underweight equities, as you well know, a lot longer for state solvents. david: keep the sound there. i want to hear there is any interaction. tim is joining us right now. when we think about these honeypots in the market? >> i agree with him. the market is clearly ignoring the negative news that we are seeing in the u.s. and the fact that we are in a recession and maybe longer in europe. it is not deterring people from buying stocks right now. you could certainly call it a bubble in general. i think equities was probably overheated here. given the weak industrial numbers, g
's not forget we also had a dismal report on durable goods orders, once again showing weakness in this economy. investors not worried about these numbers today. >> we got decent news out of europe and china this morning. either way, we're asking if investors should think twice before buying into this kind of a rally based on what the u.s. economy is telling us right now. let's talk about it in today's "closing bell" exchange. we have larry blazer from mayflower advisers and our own rick santelli and mandy drury. larry glazer, you happen to believe that economically there's an iceberg dead ahead. this market doesn't act like it today. >> no, it doesn't. you can see today investors are so focused on the global stimlouse story that they're missing the big picture. the big picture is the fact that the economic data, particularly global manufacturing data, is absolutely rolling over. look at chinese manufacturing, down 11 months in a row. you hit the nail on the head. gdp, durable goods, all a sign of weakness. the problem is the catalysts are behind us and the icebergs are ahead. you've got the fi
. the economy is obviously a big part of this story. the qe announcement providing a shock to stock. we'll talk to charlie evans at 8:30 eastern time. and then it is your money, your vote. we'll start the countdown to the first presidential tee batd, that is on wednesday night. we'll be turning to a pair of political strategists in the next half hour for a preview. plus a cnbc exclusive, julia boars sten catching up with sheryl sandberg. including just how many people put everything about themselves online. >> does it scare that you you've helped create a generation of oversharers? >> i think what we give is people the ability to share what they want. what is one person's ridiculous oversharing is another person's regular day and we build technology that lets users share what they want to share and that's tremendously exciting. >> julia will join us with more of that conversation coming up at 7:30. and we'll find out why craig barrett is not a facebook fan. and in sports news, yes, europe has retained the ryder cup. staging a comeback after the u.s. began sunday with a big lead. europe has won
crash. we have a federal reserve that's so exasperated with its inability to get the economy moving, it's taken the unprecedented position saying it's going to stay acome date. aka, print money. we still are one more unthinkable, a slowing chinese economy. the great growth engine -- the great engine of growth that has supported global commerce for years. >> all aboard! >> including the darkest days of the dark recession. what's happened? stock market never quit, never stopped climbing. it's had a remarkable run with every sector leading the charge at one time or another. before i get into the big remonstrations for the evening. i have gotten the big picture right. the europe, the slowdown of china and the perma low growth, the united states. some income producers, growth names and stocks with solid dividend boosts and, of course, some gold. these have been the correct calls to make. i've stuck with this market because i believe europeans are not suicidal. so far so good on that front. at least of late. i believe chinese economy will simply come back by virtue of the fact there's a treme
for pouring more fed dollars in economy, and the markets pulled back. rich edson will have more on mr. bernanke's speech coming up. and the dow is still up, 161 points, that is the biggest intraday point gain, by the way, since september the 13th financial stocks leading the dow right now including, yes, the bank of america, america express, jpmorgan all having banner days. microsoft remaining the biggest laggard after two price targets cuts from jeffrey's and rbc. we've got traders at the new york stock exchange, the cme group and the nymex. let's take a look at the cme, charlie needles, the cme. charlie, what a day? is it all on the back of the ism numbers? >> it is. you know, chi pmi came out overnight, and that showed things have stabilized there, in china. european pmi was in line, not lighting the world on fire. a little concern over the employment situation there. but if you look at the breakdown of the u.s. pmi, you kind of hit on all cylinders. the prices paid was actually a little higher, but if you're trying to reflate the market, that's a decent measure. it had been 54 las
happening in the economy, disease -- does it not? >> i agree. look, there are major headwinds out there. it's hard to be positive about anything. europe's slowing down can, we're printing money like crazy, and when you're dealing with a world where the growth is coming from reducing friction as opposed to sort of increasing thrust, there's just not a lot of foundation there. there's nothing solid that investors or anyone can really stand on to be positive, in my opinion. david: and, stephen, i didn't like what ben bernanke and his buddies at the fed did, but the fact that they did that indicates that what they were seeing -- they have access to all kinds of data we don't have access to -- what they saw was something bordering on recession, otherwise they would not have gone all in as they did with qe3. >> yeah. you know, make no mistake, from the longer-term perspective, i agree. the negative impact of this easy money, you know, will catch up with us, but i think it's still several years down the road and probably comes most likely in the form of inflation. but right now particularly the eq
work. but this is not one of those times. when the federal reserve talks about getting the economy moving by any means necessary it is really talking about getting more data like today's terrific ism number. given that the europeans and chinese are doing the same thing, if you're betting against the market you're fighting major central banks around the world that are doing their best to generate good data and sometimes their best is good enough. why does this overused cliche matter so much? ben bernanke said he's going to continue to buy bonds to keep interest rates down, so that this purchasing manager's number won't be an aberration. when you examine the fundamental of individual stocks, you are playing what's known as the micro. when you take into account the big data numbers like the purchasing manager's index, you're making a macro analysis. again though like the idea of fighting the fed this micro/macro dichotomy might mean nothing to you unless you took ec 101. let's put it in terms that everybody can understand. anyone who's been to a museum or taken an art class knows that
. that's what's happening now, coming to grips with their economy is going to be horrendous for a long time. >> thank you very much. i'm sure we'll check back with you later this morning. >>> we have to go? really? we do? all right. coming up, this football stuff. >> we'll get into some of this. >> today's national weather forecast. in sports, another team clinches a major league baseball playoff spot. but pointless, really. going to lose to the reds one way or another. >>> both president obama and mitt romney will be in ohio today. the story behind that swing state. >>> welcome back. take a look and you'll see that the dow futures are slightly higher. s&p futures up by close to two and a half. this comes after the market ended on its weakest levels of the day yesterday. yesterday was the worst day for the month of september for the dow. it was the worst day in two months for the nasdaq and it was the worst day in three months for the s&p 500. all of that kind of playing out overseas as well. in europe this morning, you are going to see some red arrows. a lot of concern about what's ha
to be the worst month of the year historically. we know the global economy is weakening. everybody came on our air saying hey. short the global economy. this did not turn out to be such a good theory did it? right now, 2.9% for one of the best months of the year. not the best month but among the better months of the year. what were the two biggest gains we had this month? the two biggest days? september 6th? that was the day draghi announced the bond buying program. biggest gain. second biggest gain september 13th the day of the fomc meeting. what does this tell us? it tells us what matters in the world is central bank intervention and also what's going on in europe. what was the worst day this year? it was tuesday, the day we saw the riots in madrid because that's the day everybody said uh-oh. this whole deal with spain and this careful choreography moving toward help from the eu could fall apart. turns out maybe it's holding together a little better than anticipated. my point is what moves the world is central bank intervention and what's going on in europe. to play against that is very, very da
, this president's policies on the economy have failed and failed miserably. if he is reelected we will have four more years. now it is becoming more and more clear that his foreign policy is crumbling around the world, and is not just the middle east. people are missile defense systems out of europe to appease russians. they spend $700 billion more on defense. he has tried to appease the chinese. they are expanding their sovereignty claims a round the world. the middle east policy is crumbling around it. america needs leaders. right now the only opportunity we will have is president romney. i hope you will see that. lou: thank you for being here. >> thank you. good to be with you. lou: much more on the president's speech to the united nations general assembly straight ahead. ♪ >> president obama has the lead in almost all national polls, but his lead varies widely. why? which poll should we believe? chain in green with our report. consumer confidence sores. home prices rise. the dow jones industrials take a triple digit dice. what is behind the south of? wall street legend michael holland with
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)

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